Interactions

How 9 Enneagram types perceive interactions

interactions
Interactions and the Enneagram

We interact with others all day long, on the phone, in person, and online. Some of us like interacting; some of us don’t. Some enjoy interacting with others, but only under certain conditions – for example, when we are rested, or when the discussion is cerebral or emotional, or when we know the other people well. Effective interactions have less to do with whether we are introverted or extroverted and more to do with our Enneagram type and the type of the other person.

The Enneagram’s interactions application shows you how to interact more effectively with people of all Enneagram types by understanding how each type likes to relate and interact with others, how these differences affect our interactions, and what you can do to enhance your interpersonal relationships.

Find out about the interaction strengths, challenges and development tips for each Enneagram type.

Strengths

One
Polite, consistent, committed to important relationships, funny (very funny) when relaxed
Two
Kind, interested in other people, ask questions that engage the other person, warm
Three
Overall optimism and “can-do” spirit can be contagious, strong social skills put others at ease
Four
Establish deep connections easily, sensitive to emotional issues, willing to stay engaged in important conversations
Five
Extremely knowledgeable in a variety of topics, perceptive and clear, non-intrusive
Six
Enjoy repartee and dynamic conversations, sincerity and forthrightness, and loyal or dedicated to important relationships
Seven
Fun, contagious enthusiasm, high energy, stimulating ideal generation, spontaneous
Eight
Straightforward, direct, provide understanding of complex issues, honest
Nine
Easy to talk with, accepting, approachable, interested, affirming, relaxed

Challenges

One
Give judgmental verbal and non-verbal messages, sharp speaking tone when opinions are challenged, feel easily criticized
Two
Reluctant to express real feelings, focus more on the other person than on self, give the message that they want something unspoken or are faultless
Three
Impatient, disinterested in topic or person, appear inauthentic or staged
Four
Talk about themselves more than display interest in others, overly interpersonally sensitive, moody
Five
Reluctant to engage, appear detached, don’t express feelings, non-approachable
Six
Act suspicious, raise too many questions too quickly, need confirmation from others when anxious or confused
Seven
Talk more than listen or talk over others, lose interest quickly and immediately disengage, defuse serious situations through humor or distraction
Eight
Demanding and commanding, unwilling to entertain opposing viewpoints, easily angered
Nine
Appear to agree when this is not the case, unwilling to say exactly what they think and feel

Development tips

One
Become more flexible, relaxed and less judgmental and reactive, learn to laugh at yourself
Two
Acknowledge yourself to yourself and then to others by examining what you really feel, think, and want
Three
Engage with others in a more spontaneous and real way, explore what you want and feel, not what you should want and feel
Four
Integrate objectivity with emotionality to find equilibrium in your heart, mind, and body
Five
Share more of yourself – thoughts, feelings, and personal experiences – and talk about more than facts
Six
Have more faith in yourself and in others to handle whatever happens, stay grounded in your body
Seven
Learn to focus mentally, emotionally, and physically at will, listen more fully
Eight
Be more open and forthcoming about your vulnerabilities, sadness, and anxiety
Nine
Express yourself – thoughts, feelings, needs, and preferences – even when they oppose those of others

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